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Biblical Basis
Mentoring should be away of Christian development in the church especially among men. According to the (International Journal for Pastors, 2017) mentoring is described as the process by which an experienced person counsels or guides another to help them grow and develop. In [Deuteronomy 11:19] God tells Israel to mentor others so they may know and understand His word. This is done by talking it (Action) when you sit at home and walk (Action) when you are along the road.
Another biblical example of mentoring among men is Jethro and Moses [Exodus 2:18; Exodus 18:1-27]. God puts Moses in a position where he is taken out of a place of power and put in a place of submission and servitude. When Moses came into the land of Midian, he became a sheep herder under Jethro regime. Moses could not reach his destiny without first being a servant and secondly being mentored during the process of becoming great; Jethro not only became a mentor, but Jethro became his Father-in-Law. This suggests that not only was the relationship strengthening through knowledge and wisdom, but mentoring can become strengthen among family. Interestingly, we see that the relationship with Joshua and Moses also stemmed from a spirit of servitude. In this chapter we see that there are four mentoring lessons that can be observed.

  1. Mentoring develops a close relationship.
    a. Moses marries Jethro daughter (Exodus 2:11-21)
  2. A Mentors job is to make positive investments in the lives of those they mentor.
    a. Jethro taught Moses to be a shepherd (Exodus 3:1).
  3. A mentor desires the best for his mentee.
    a. Jethro was excited about how God blessed and used Moses. Moses success was Jethro success (Exodus 18:9-12).
  4. Mentoring takes transparency.
    a. Moses was willing to be vulnerable (admitting fears, weaknesses and mistakes; Exodus 18: 8).
    Much later in Moses life [Exodus 24:13], Moses becomes the wise and seasoned mentor to Joshua. As the people of Israel get to the point where they are almost ready to reach the Promised Land, Moses had to mentor someone to take the people further in their journey, this person was Joshua. As Jethro and Moses relationship grew from a personal relationship, this mentorship came from a personal relationship that was formed between the two. The relationship between Moses and Joshua was bound together from many years of servitude. Because of the servitude, relationship, and the confidence that was built between the two, Joshua was the obvious choice to lead the people of Israel in the Promised Land.
    First Samuel Chapter 9-15, we see that Samuel served as a mentor to Saul the king. Samuel was known for giving godly counsel in leading the people of Israel. But this is a story where godly counsel was not wanted all the time. Saul did not always listen to what Samuel had to say which lead to Saul losing his kingship to David. This is a prime example of how a mentoring relationship did not work. It is imperative that a mentee to humble themselves to listen to sound advice from the mentor. Samuel also mentored King David. In the scripture 1 Samuel 16:13, you will see where listening to sound advice was successful. Although King David was not a perfect man, David’s character was to listen to sound advice. God honors those who are willing to listen to wisdom. This mentoring relationship leads to Samuel anointing David as King.
    In [I Kings 19:15-21], one the most spiritual transformational form of mentorship is the example of Elijah and Elisha. Through the guidance of the spirit of God, Elijah sought out Elisha and there the mentorship was developed. In this mentorship one of the main ingredients was loyalty and a great love for one another [2 King 19: 15-21].
    In Elijah’s last days, Elisha stuck by his side. Elisha grew to not only be mentored by Elijah but also, they became a part of each other’s lives. When God is a part of the equation of sending a mentor to an individual, a spiritual transformation should take place. We see here in the scripture where mentoring isn’t just a short-term situation but a spiritual

Data Summary
Please summarize your data by responding to the following:

  1. Describe the strengths of community as evidenced by Windshield Survey.
  2. Describe the weaknesses (gaps in service) as evidenced by Windshield Survey.
  3. Identify 1 problem based on the identified gap in community resources as an indicator of potential poor health outcomes

Type Of Service:Dissertation services
Type Of assignment: Dissertation
Subject: Religion and Theology
Pages/words: 18/4950
Number of sources: 5
Academic Level: Doctoral
Paper Format: Chicago
Line Spacing: Double
Language style: US English