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Ninth Reflection Question

Answer the following question in 300-500 words.

Aside from Medea, Greek mythology features a small but striking band of strong-willed, capable and independently-minded females, for example, Gaia, Rhea, Atalanta, Helen and Clytemnestra.  None of these, however, ends up with any real kind of success or independence:

• Gaia and Rhea may revolt against their husbands, but they end up sidelined by their sons;

• Atalanta shines in the Calydonian boar hunt, but then loses the key foot race to her suitor

because of the golden apples;

• Helen enjoys a few years with the (undistinguished) lover of her choice, only to be reclaimed

and taken back home by her husband; and

• Clytemnestra is murdered by her son before she can murder him because of a gullibility that is

gendered as female.

But then there is Medea, who flies off in a chariot to live happily in exile, until she goes to the Elysian Fields in the afterlife and maybe marries Achilles.  How to explain this? Part of it, of course, is the conceptual universe in which Medea’s story lives, but I would suggest that the real answer lies in a simple premise that is a sort of iron law in the ancient Greek world: that there is the male sphere and the female sphere, and women can never really operate successfully in the male sphere, or challenge male dominance for any length of time, before they fall prey to female inferiority or some aspect of their innate femininity that makes them weaker than men.  So, could it be that this is what is so revolutionary about the Medea of Euripides? Could it be that, while all the other women eventually fail because they are still essentially women, Medea succeeds because (as the ancient Greeks would say) she is ultimately male in all respects that matter?  Agree or disagree, being sure to explain and support your answer.

Type of service: Academic Paper writing
Type of assignment: Team Paper
Subject: Religion & Theology
Pages/words: 2 /300
Number of sources: 0
Academic level: High School
Paper format: MLA
Line spacing: Double
Language style: US English